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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the upcoming battle over the next round of negotiations on the debt ceiling, which i think both republicans in the house and the democrats in the senate and the white house are going to say, you know, again try to find -- could they reach a grand bargain, any kind of bargain not only to raise the debt ceiling but bring down the deficit long term. the democrat budget, of course, talks about a big tax hike over ten years of about $1 trillion. republicans say they're not going to do that. they want to roll back obama care. these are the two outside extreme positions. that's where we're at now. going forward can they come together and find some middle ground? >> weigh in on that, lauren. is there really a chance for reconciling these two extreme budgets? >> i think david kind of nailed it here. when it comes to the budgets, they're just a little bit too far, but this budget process isn't a waste of time. i think it's promising that they went through regular order. this is something that the senate hasn't done. they haven't passed a budget this a long time. i think what we'll see is this may ope
the extension of, i guess, the next big challenge of the congress is what? the debt ceiling? >> debt ceiling. it's a continuing resolution. i guess that's been passed. >> already passed. >> the debt ceiling, which i think was anticnated august or september, last week, i haven't checked all of the details. the last time i checked in with this, way back when the republican senators had dinner with president obama,ists told that they didn't expect the debt ceiling issue to come to a head until august or september. so, they've kind of kicked the can down on the road on that one. it will be awhile. i suspects on the budget that will be the next big thing. >> one more time. you may have missed a few if you were out of town but michelle bachman gave a controversial speech at cpac where she went after the president for living a life of luxury in the white house including the fact that he had, you know, six-figured dog walker, dana bash from cnn tried to chase down michelle bachman. she had to chase her down running, michelle bachman running away. we will play a quick cli
, they're going to have to during one of the cr's or debt ceiling debates, they are going to have to shut the government down. we still take in 2.7 trillion, will pay for medicare, social security, will pay off our debt, the full faith and credit of the united states, but isn't that the only way that ryan's budget gets done? >> no, no, not at all. ryan's budget, you know, we're going to have a series of sequential battles. what's going to happen is the democrats in the senate are going to ultimately pass some kind of a budget resolution. i doubt it's going to be like this one. republicans in the the house are going to pass the budget committee resolution and these set levels for all of the appropriations committee allowing for protection and that is to say you can have expedited consideration of appropriations bills that fall under that level. the republicans are going to pass bills that have spending lower than the democrats. the democrats are going to have bills, they're higher than the republicans and then we're going to fight it out bill by bill by bill by bill through the balance of
was that the senate democrats had to pass a budget in order to get a debt ceiling increase. they'll pass a budget. the house passed a budget. in theory what they're supposed to do is reconcile the two of them, come up with a compromise and make that budget the law. that's not going to happen, this was the end. this bill is going to die and there's no implication for keystone, excel, abortion or anything else. it's symbolic. >> quoting myself, it's a statement of priorities. and the fact that the republicans are still trying to litigate the issue of the affordable care act, still talking about contraception, still talking about a woman's right to choose, it's a testament, those are not winning issues for the republican party. i want to talk to you, josh, you have a great column in bloomberg view, talking about republicans and their deficit amnesia. michael writes in the "daily beast," the gop is advancing three crucial lies, that we have to balance the budget, that public investment at this point is irresponsible and that if we do slash spending and balance the budget, jobs will come. it's all non
years. under the debt ceiling deal of january, if the senate doesn't pass the budget by april 15, senators would have the paychecks withheld. you would be in a embarrassing headlines of senator having the pay withheld for not doing the job. that's a political hot potato. maybe there's truth. for moran he wants to have a certain number of cosponsors as well worried about impact of on air traffic controller by the sequestration that went in to effect march 1st. the $85 million cuts across the board have pretty much cut federal spending. >> on the cr, the rest of 2013 assuming the senate wraps up the work in the next day or so, how quickly is the house likely to take it up and pass it? >> talking house appropriation chairman was saying it's likely that unless terrorist some last minute changes or amendments he doesn't know about it the house will quickly move to bring the senate cr unchanged to the floor under a closed rule. and the house can move with lightening speed compared to the senate. we should see a vote quickly before they leave for easter recess. i think it's clear in the
't and jumped out at me. one of the things we heard going back to the debt ceiling negotiations in the summer of 2011, john boehner saying in effect the president played loosesy and -- lucy and yanked football and was not keeping his word on obligations he said he would undertake. i wonder if joe biden going back to offer a at this time for at that time argument? would be interesting to for reporters would follow up. what were the five occasions? what were the specific deals and how did republicans back out at them? bill: what date did it happen and what did republicans supposedly promise you and how did they renege on that. >> right. bill: here is john boehner, 10 days ago, similar topic here. listen to the speaker. >> republicans want to balance the budget. the president doesn't. republicans want to solve our long-term debt problem. the president doesn't. we want to unlock our energy resources to put more americans back to work. the president doesn't. bill: he also said it will take more than dinner dates and phone calls. and that goes back to your point about the charm offensive. like, wha
when they are facing a sequester frankly. the debt ceiling back in 2011. half our time in the senate between january and june, half of our time was not spent on legislative business. in fact in 2011 alone, it was one of the fewest number of days we've been in session since 1992 and here it was coinciding with one of the event that created the highest level of policy uncertainty of any event over the last 20 years, surpassing the wars, surpassing the financial crieses, september 11th. just to name some major events. and that debt ceiling debacle did more to disrupt the public's confidence in the integrity of the political process in washington. so you have to make your elected officials accountable. have you social immediate yafment you can build an online community snainsly and you get a message multiplire. by doing that you can find out where your law makers are. are they in session five days a week? they should be working. these are things you can be doing now. these are simple solutions but concrete ones. how can you deal with the issues of our day in two and a half days a week. t
the debt ceiling is hit. i think that's the most fertile time for us. i think what republicans want to see, wolf, they want to see a 75-year actuary soundness. we want to make sure the programs are going to be there for the future. the president knows we want to make sure these programs are there, and what the presidents wants, obviously, is some additional revenue. i believe there's a possibility if we could get the 75-year soundness on medicare and social security with appropriate changes and reforms, i think there may be a way through full tax reform to do something that will generate revenue and fit the needs of both sides, and that's what i'm hopeful is going to happen over the next four months. look, there's no negotiation that's happening right now. there's some general discussions that have taken place, but i think the environment is going to be the best that it's been in the next several months. >> just to be precise, under certain circumstances to save social security and medicare over 75 years, you'd be willing to raise tax revenue. do you have a number, two to one, three to one
: yeah, how long? >> it would be only for a few months, so we still face the debt ceiling issue very shortly. >> bill: that comes up next and i think this extension goes until september if i recall seeing -- >> that's right. the end of the fiscal year uh-huh. >> bill: right. congress woman judy chew who represents the seat formerly hell by our good friend hilda solis. who often has come in studio with us. we look forward to seeing you come in the studio with us some day as well. on the issue of immigration reform, even rand paul came out and didn't go as far as the president, but he did say -- put himself in the camp of those who think it's time for immigration reform, dealing with that issue with those of us from southern california have been dealing with for a long time. are you optimistic about chances? >> i am optimistic in this time of people thinking of us being at a partisan strangle hold there is cooperation here. i was very encouraged about the work put out, i do believe that the immigration reform bill will move award. >> bill: if it moves ahead and r
and the debt ceiling. it seemed like he was a on a roll in the early weeks. >> right, jon, but that may establish the point which is, that if you start out with a lower level of popularity than presidents traditionally started out, their second term, you have further to fall, to rise in the polls if you're numbers go up but you have less to fall if, below to get that below that 50% mark. if you start out with a highly partisan, politicized electorate they will really come down on you like a ton of bricks if you do anything they don't like, which is a point that nate silver made in a recent analysis on the polling drop. i think coming right after this, the president's, what seems to be a very successful trip to the middle east just shows you that the american people are focused on the economy and they're focused on economic uncertainty. they're not focused on foreign policy as much as some of us would like, they really care about whether or not he's going to deliver any economic prosperity in the second term. jon: as we look at that video of the president shaking hands with world leaders
to be agreement in congress, but we are not there yet. we have a debt ceiling. while they passed to budgets, they still have not gone to the whole process. we could continue with these stop-measures to keep the government from shutting down until eight -- an agreement is made. , go ahead.ssee caller: i would like her to define the word "politico." americanught government for the past 19 years and we are not governed by parties. we do not covered by the constitution. example which one is not mentioned in the constitution. if madison and hamilton thought it was important and washington thought it was important, it would have been in there. resolutions are non- binding. all it does is increase the burden of debt of my students who are now in debt probably $50,000 already. they have not graduated from high school already. households are in debt to the tune of $150,000 -- host: you have given us a lot to work with. what level do you teach? caller: high school. 12th graders? caller: yes, sir, u.s. government. guest: host: if you go to our website, you will find information that could be helpful i
the debt ceiling ceiling $2.1 trillion ae agreed to reduce spending over ten years, $2.1 trillion. before the ink was dry, the president was proposing to eliminate the cuts he agreed to. he's been fighting to eliminate those cuts from the beginning. and they're really not cuts. they're simply -- if they were properly applied, it would reduce the growth of spending and not cut spending actually at all. so the committee that was supposed to find all the cuts failed. the sequester came into law. it's an antimilitary provision. it was put in by jack lew, a very liberal member of the president's, at that time, chief of staff for offic office of mot and budget. the president seems to be quite happy to see these cuts fall on the defense department. he seems to be happy to have this happen. why do you say that? i say, because he's done nothing to philadelphia it. -- to fix it except demand something that he has no right to demand. that is, to violate this agreement and raise taxes and spend more. and that's not going to happen. congress is not going to vote to violate the agreement they made with
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)